Guest Post: Never too late to begin Prepping

So you have been watching television, catching the newest trend of prepping, and the more you watch the more you start to realize that it is not the exception to prep but becoming the norm in our world.  As you sit and watch, thinking a few thoughts, such as how will I ever get that much stuff put up in a short time, and how will I ever pay for this with the cost of everything else climbing.  Stop, please take a deep breath, and relax.  Prepping is neither a race nor a competition, and it is never too late to start.

First is your immediate location, pick up a notebook and take stock of what you have on hand, please remember to check your expiration dates.  With this information, plan out meals with on hand items.  Remember that electric might not be available so when planning that has to be take that into account if you cook with electric.  Plan on what you and your family would need to survive for one week at your current location.  These are the items that you first need to pick up.  Cooking alternatives at your home location, you could use a wood stove, or grill, but both require fuel, another consideration.  Keep extra wood, charcoal, and or propane tank on hand, enough to get you thru one month.  Water: a necessary item for drinking, washing and cooking, you must plan this item into all prepping.  A small kid’s pool in the yard will hold water for washing clothes and flushing toilets, bottled water for drinking and cooking.  Remember the key to food is having food that they will eat, if not you are just wasting your money. 

I used the following sites for determining shelve life on items: http://www.sailingbreezes.com/sailing_breezes_current/articles/may03/refrigeration.htm, http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/FreezerChart.htm, and http://www.y2kkitchen.com/html/can_code_decoder.html. There are many sites to help you along the way and if you have a question but cannot find the answer, type it into your computer and let it do the searching for you or blog to others, there is a ton of knowledge out here, use it to learn and grow.

Once you have determined the food needs and have taken care of those items, move on to medical.  Do you have items needed for cuts, burns, vitamins, aspirins, toothpaste and toothbrushes, sanitary needs, razors, deodorants, and other items that would fit into these category, again make list and remember dollar stores offer many savings in stocking.

Once you have reached you goal of having supplies on hand for a week, increase the time frame to a month, then to two months, remember the idea is not do more than you are monetarily comfortable with.   There are some great alternatives to help save money, such as canning yourself, buying in bulk (Sam’s, Costco, and BJ’s) or coupons and circular mailings.  On line there are many places to order FD (freeze dried) or dehydrated products, again shop around before you buy, compare prices and shipping cost of each company.  I use Microsoft Excel and have my spreadsheet with me at all times, to add items or to shop for items.  Below is an example of my spreadsheet, I have one for food, medical, personal hygiene and seeds, which can be adjusted as needed and set to self calculate my cost for planning purposes.

Product shelf life servings on hand need remaining Cost Total
SpamTurkey forever

20

26

6

$2.78

how to bug in

$16.68

Spam Bacon forever

17

26

9

$2.78

$25.02

Spam forever

20

26

6

$2.78

$16.68

Salmon 5 to 6 yrs

40

52

12

$2.78

$33.36

VienneSausage 2.5 per can

106

212

106

$0.00

Tuna 4 to 6 yrs

27

52

25

$2.00

$50.00

Black Label Canned Ham

0

12

12

$0.00

Ham 24 months

22

26

4

$5.00

$20.00

Chicken 36 months

40

48

8

$2.00

$16.00

Crab 48 to 60 m

22

22

0

$2.00

$0.00

Sausage Gravy

2

6

4

$0.00

Dried Beef forever

10

26

16

$1.88

$30.08

$207.82

 

Where would you go if and when you had to leave your home (called bugging out)? This is a big consideration; do you have a second location in mind?  Is this your personal location or will you be moving in with others?  If it is a personal location, now plan to start food prepping this location.  Remember a secondary cooking method is needed at this location also.  For $50.00 you can get 50 lbs of rice, 20 lbs of beans, tuna, elbow noodles and peanut butter.  This is a start and can feed you for some time.  Each trip to the store add to this, first more essentials then start on secondary items, fruit (both canned and dried), soup (canned and dried), vegetables (size of cans depend on people at location).  Remember a must, there are no stores, and we are back to the basics of baking.  Flour is a must for bread and the Internet has great sites for recipes.

If you are bugging to someone else’s location, please remember, they need to be prepared to have you, meaning food should be purchased and stored ahead of time, nobody should expect others to provide shelter and food for everyone without pitching in to help.  Get with the people at your bug out location and plan out what you can do to help get the preparation under way.   You might not be able to take much when you leave, so things have to be at your secondary location ahead of time.  Walk thru you home, take stock of things like extra blankets, pillows and towels and then remember to get a box and either ship or deliver them to that location as soon as possible, also extra clothing and shoes, this will lighten the load of your bug out bag making room for other items.   As above remember medical items will be needed at this location also, As your taking stock of these items, go room by room and ask what would I miss the most in this room, and if possible, pack it up and get it to your secondary location, again remember coats if in a colder climate.  In the world we live in, most of us have an over abundance of many items, more than we need at one location, but maybe not enough if you have people knocking at your door.  So if you plan on knocking, plan on helping those to prepare.  If you are the host, accept all items as it will help save you cost. One idea is to host a prepper dinner to discuss items needed with all those coming to your home.

Prepping is best done one step at a time, as not to become overwhelmed, which is a true setback.  Food, water and medical are first concerns, where to go if needed would be next.  The ability to protect you and your family would be step three.  Take each step one at a time, and learn to prep something daily, even if it is just writing down something in your notebook, as it teaches you daily preparedness.  Do remember that you still need to do special things for you and or your family, and prepping should not come at the cost of all pleasures, but you will find that prepping will give you different type of pleasure and that you will spend less on some of the superficial things and more on things that matter.

The last area is really a mental prep.  Know that you might walk away from everything that you own in life to survive, and that you might never get those things back.  You must prepare yourself to do so, and you must be able to help others with this especially little one and older ones.  It is easy to say that is not a problem, but until you are faced with this and accept it there will be a problem, you will need to grieve to move forward and as with all losses the more prepared you are the least of a shock it will be to you.  To prepare is to be ahead, to procrastinate is to be behind.

 


20 survival items ebook cover

Like what you read?

Then you're gonna love my free PDF, 20 common survival items, 20 uncommon survival uses for each. That's 400 total uses for these innocent little items!

Just enter your primary e-mail below to get your link. This will also subscribe you to my newsletter so you stay up-to-date with everything: new articles, ebooks, products and more!

→    

Print Friendly

3 Comments

  1. All I can add to this is when looking at buying freeze dried and dehydrated foods be sure and watch your oz pre package as this varies widely like from EE you get far more buying diced potatoes than you will buying sliced and the difference is even greater depending on the brand so remember to figure your cost per oz not price per can . Anyway I hope that helps .
    Robert W

  2. Thank you for all the different warnings, ideas and thoughts for surviving a disaster. I am a new prepper and have really enjoyed reading about how to prepare for a disaster. Some I have thought of myself when I first started two months ago, but a lot of creative ideas have come from you. Last week I bought a collapsible clothes drying rack for drying our clothes inside our home. I read about using distilled white vinegar to wash our clothes in a wash tub. I find it really interesting that I now see things through the eyes of “how and will this help us in a disaster?” Again, thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*