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YouTube Video: A slow or fast movement out of the cities in a WROL situation?

Well folks – what do you think?

-Rourke

 

 

14 comments to YouTube Video: A slow or fast movement out of the cities in a WROL situation?

  • Tim

    I think SP1 covered the most likely scenarios and agree that it will depend on what type of catastrophe it is, and how severe. The diversion ideas make perfect sense albeit cruel as he mentioned, but hey, this is survival.
    Community vs individuals etc….all books I’ve read advise the same thing against hordes, gangs etc. My problem here is nobody around ME wants to prep like that, or they want to prep food, supplies etc, but don’t own guns and don’t believe people will ever be desperate enough to take from them by force and/or hurt them for it.

  • Suni

    SouthernPrepper1 always has great advice. Thanks for posting this

  • Bev

    Thank you for the video! Lots of thought provoking points.

  • D.

    I am inclined to think a fast flood over a period of 3-4 days. The hoards, of course are dependant on the population/density of the largest closest city. Even a small percentage of a very large cities population will easily overwhelm smaller outlying towns. The 3 days of shelf food I believe will determine the exodus date as well as the amount of time it takes for the public utitilties (WATER, fire, police) to fall down. I hope they all stay, as once the die off starts, I believe it will be very rapid, as we have a fragile populace dependant upon everything. I can see them staying in place (For a while) in any thing other than a clear and present danger, but eventually they will move (after the food runs out, the water system sours) in a paniced mass. I believe the nomadic drive to follow/search out food is genetic.

    I really like the false flag signs. The best battle is the one you don’t have to fight.

    Always enjoy SP1s videos, keeps me thinking outside the box, even if I don’t always agree with him. He is a wealth of field craft. Regards, D.

  • A trickle or a gaggle? I agree that it depends on the circumstances. An “event” would lead to loads of people leaving town whereas an “extended crisis” would create the trickle.

    In the “event”, people would drive out of town immediately, probably headed to the next large town with hotels, restaurants, and supplies, bypassing the smaller towns and rural areas. They would have gas (mostly) and credit cards to pay for items in the short term, not looking to take or beg from others.

    In an “extended crisis” people would trickle out as their varying meager supplies are exhausted. I forsee them having driven around town looking for supplies and hanging out until they have reached the personal crisis level and have given up on government. Some will die waiting on FEMA to arrive. Some will give up at the last moment and walk out of town. Some may have a little gas left and drive as far as they can, running out at the neighboring small towns. These are the ones that will cause the problems for the neighboring rural communities. They will have no supplies, will be sick having resorted to drinking river or lake water after a short walk, they will be affected by the heat/cold of the current season and some will be injured from the unaccustomed physical exertion and from walking in their “work” loafers, heeled shoes or summer ‘flip-flops’. There will be other issues but that sums up the point.

  • riverrider

    i think it will come in waves. first, the survivalists then preppers will bugout at the first signs of trouble. then later as resources dwindle and the conditions deteriorate another wave of concerned folks head to grandma’s house. the rest will hang on waiting for their savior obama to help them. too late they will realize help won’t be when or what they expected. as the pickin’s get slim for the predator class, they will begin to foray further and further out until they either find a target rich environment or get killed in the search thereof. thats how i see it. being just off a major line of drift, our mag plans to bulldoze the only road into our deadend road and toss in a couple abiti’s at choke points. it will be a while before things get bad enough for the waves to breach our obstacles, allowing us to prep the zone for their reception. all this assumes its not a nuke or the like requiring mass evac. i’m trying to talk my local em into blocking the exits into town with semi’s or barriers in that event. right now he thinks thats too harsh. we’ll see if he changes his mind in time or not. i’m out of the town but it is a crossroads of major metro areas north,south and east, and backed up against the first major mountain chain to the west, with a tricky mountain pass. i see a lot of folks hitting town with no gas, food or money and nowhere to go. can you say major choke point? the em has no clue.

  • Linda L.

    I agree. If you are too old to be a Girl Scout there is no place like home. I recently asked my urban dwelling 29 year old son if the SHTF on 12-21-12 would he try to work his way from the city over here to the beach where I live & he said not to count on it. He wasn’t even sure he could figure out how to navigate the distance by foot. This was from someone who until recently was a very active primitive Kayaking camper. The more the young blood of this contry depend on electronic devices to navigate not only their world, but their future
    ( it elected a President if one can imagine that) then they better plan to just stay put. As you so aptly stated it would not be smart to just follow the road signs! Everyone capable of putting one foot in front of the other should have at least one road map that is not electronic. Even if, like myself, you don’t plan to go anywhere at least you will be able to tell where everyone else will be coming from!

  • Fred

    The info was very good.
    The part about the signs?
    If SHTF does come to your area putting up a sign saying food and water 4 miles ahead and when people get 4 mile ahead and find nothing they may come back to look for food and water and everything you have and whom ever put up the lying signs.

  • Badger359

    I think one has to contemplate and plan various “EAP” (Emergency Action Plans) addressing those senarios mentioned by SP1. I remember a movie as a child with Ray Milland getting his family our of L.A. from an attack and going through a small town and having to deal with hardships. That movie and living through the riots of the 60′s in Richmond Ca. Preppare for the worst, hope for the best.

  • Gary Hines

    Very good video with some good points. I would like to add a few things to your work. First of all, bugging out to a remote location and travelling by yourself can be quite dangerous in a time of chaos. You should develop a small network of people to bu out with with varying skills and backgrounds. I live in NJ, and where I live we have a small group of people who if necessary would bug out together. One is a doctor, one a security contractor, myself a mechanic and gunsmith, a mechanical engineer, a couple of veterans and an NRA instructor. We all have families to protect, and travelling together well armed would make us an unfavorable target to the gangs who would be looting people, buildings and houses. In Coney Island NY, after hurricane Sandy, gangs of youth were robbing people and breaking into homes with people still in them knowing they were unarmed as NYC has a firearms ban. The cops were unable to do anything effective and FEMA had already failed. For these reasons, its best to get out of an urban environment ASAP in a disaster. Also, its a good idea to consider ATV’s as alternate bug out vehicles. You can travel through the woods, as well as be able to weave around vehicles on highways that may be grid locked or abandoned. They can carry two people and extra gear. This is our groups next investment. ATV’s can be used for pleasure, but also make getting out of dodge much easier when highways are blocked or congested. Great video! Keep prepping!

  • Irish-7

    I have a lot of respect for Southern Prepper. He probably forgot more about disaster and crisis than I’ll ever know. But, I think he is wrong here. Economic collapse will bring about riots when the entitlement crowd is no longer spoon fed. The working folks living in the cities will want to get away from the social chaos. Also, Martial Law is a lot more likely in the urban areas than in the rural zones. People living in the suburbs will be overrun quickly and add to the problem as they pack up and fan out. Any area within 350 miles (about a full tank of fuel) of a city is due to see an influx of strangers. This will especially hold true for those towns and villages adjacent to major highways. As far as the deceptive signs go, I am not in favor of this idea. What about those folks living on the other side of that 4 mile trek? They don’t want the Golden Horde either? These people are practically your neighbors! More than likely, your children go to the same schools, play on the same sports teams, etc. If I put up any signs, they will simply state: “Retired military man, desires to be left alone. I don’t have enough for my own family, so I damn sure can’t feed yours. I will consider any incursion on my property as hostile and will respond with deadly force. For your safety and mine, leave the area and do not return”!

  • Joe Cascarelli

    Most, 80% or more, will wait in place. There is a cultural lack of decisiveness in America today. Look at Staten Island and the Jersey shore. Look at New Orleans. Look at the 2005 tsunami victims. Few have an evacuation plan. I live in a rural town of 500 people and there is no plan to deal with a serious emergency. The speaker refers to a golden hoard. Most will die in place I fear. The rugged individualism which once defined Americans is gone forever.

  • Southern Prepper One, I believe you are right about the coming bugout scenarios, I think most people will dig in at home, sure most of us who are prepared will bug out but think of it, there are over 200 million people in this country, and most of them believe that nothing is going to change anytime soon. I for one have a cabin in the Upper peninsula of Mich. and if necessary can relocate there in a moments notice. I am following most of the prepper networks closely, I took counterinsurgency training in the military am armed and have food, water, medicines, and the will to survive! Good luck to everyone out there, maybe I’ll bump into you on the other side!

  • Nightshift

    I like some of SP1′s thoughts, but he is off on the “Food 4 miles”. What if your retreat is 4 miles down the road. I wouldn’t be happy. The idiots would likely blame you for not having food. I do agree with his thoughts about when folks will migrate.

    Southern Prepper has alot of good ideas but some of it is dangerous. He is a good resource but don’t take it all as gospel.