Video: EoTech & AR15 Carbine POV Shooting

 

I realize this will not be the most exciting video ever watched but for those that do not understand the benefit of a holographic optic it is very telling.

I waited a long time before spending the money on a high-dollar EoTech 552 and have never looked back. For close-to-medium ranges it is phenomenal. It offers super fast target acquisition and super rugged. There are other similar optics out there some costing more – some costing less.

Check out this 4 minute video demonstrating a POV display while shooting.

Rourke

 

 


 

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10 Comments

  1. Bad thing with the EoTech’s if you have an Astigmatism it will look like a sunburst on the outer ring. I personally don’t care for them, opting for the Aimpoint Pro instead or the Vortex PST 1-4 (fantastic multi-range scope). But to help with the “sunburst” if you have flip up BUS, put it up with the largest aperture and it will either disappear or greatly decreased.

  2. I have several EOTECH. The most useful feature is the NV capability on some LE/Military models. The red light from these devices can illuminate the shooter in low light level situations – might as well have a flashlight, hence the IR diode in the NV models. I use EOTECH on close range weapons. I find all of the red dot, circle dot, etc. combinations to be too large for anything like precision shooting and as intended are better for CQB. I have also found that reducing the dot illumination to its lowest level of discernibility against the background provides for greatest precision. For all of my medium range battle rifles, I like the larger tritium ACOGs with reflex sight.

    For long range, I use Leopold tactical exclusively (https://www.leupold.com/tactical/scopes/). Yes, I’ve owned Swarovski, Kahles, S&B, and even a period Unertl, but overall the top end Leopold wins hands down. All of my Leopold are equipped with their rain cote, a plano glass ‘lens’ that screws into the eyepiece and objective ends of the ‘scope. This plane glass or plano as lens makers say, provides both dust and mechanical abrasion protection for sensitive coated optics. These replaceable lens can be ‘wiped’ clean with much much less care than required for coated optics and like their name, they provide water protection as well. Into the rain cote, I screw the Leopold proprietary magnetic latch flip open lens caps. There are none better. What’s more, a reticular objective obscurator such at the Tenebraex Kill Flash (http://swfa.com/Tenebraex-C1121.aspx) offer models threaded to fit Leopold objectives. I feel much more comfortable with a lens protected by rain cote planos behind the Tenebraex. You can have your Nite Force and expensive European optics. The top end Leopold tactical models offer features unparalleled – and what’s more for most of our uses, optics with optional protection for the long haul.

    PR

  3. JH, I suspect you may have something other than just astigmatism going on in your shooting eye. Astigmatism should distort linearity, not cause sunburst flashes. Of course we may have a semantic issue. I wonder if you have ever had lasik surgery? Sometimes this and like procedures cause chromatic aberrations, more so with bright lights in dark areas such as headlights – or illuminated optics, the aberrations being due to the micro slits used to provide correction.

    Everyone over 30, absent other problems, I recommend semi decade visits to an ophthalmologist for a top end check up. Ophthalmologists are MDs specializing in eye problems as opposed to DOs or Doctor of Ophthalmology, specialists indeed, but more trained for correcting vision with eye glasses and contact lens. DOs/Optometrists cannot do eye surgery and most are ill equipped for more sophisticated diagnosis. I crashed an airplane one fine day because of a detached retina. Better diagnostic care just might have prevented the detachment and saved both mechanical trauma to the bod and financial trauma caused by the loss of the airframe.

    PR

  4. I agree with Panhandle Rancher about astigmatism. I have that condition all my life and have used the eotech without any issues. And I might add, I have had lasik surgery and do see some ‘glow’ to red light, but only at night, but it is not a significant issue for me. I could have it corrected by a newer form of lasik surgery, but not going to bother. It does not affect my view of the reticle on the eotech at all either.

  5. I say we just keep adding thoughts/commenting everyday on this post. Then when Rourke comes back he can review the huge section of comments. Here you go Rourke, your welcome brother 🙂

  6. I have a couple of Eotech EXPS3-0’s, one on an M-4 the other on an AR platform. They are a great CQC optic. One of them is paired with a G33 roll over magnifier. Living in Florida it’s important to have an optic that doesn’t bloom in bright sun light. I also have an ACOG on my SCAR 17, green chevron, no blooming at all with the green. And a quick note to Pan Handle Rancher, I have those pesky NightForce optics on my long range rifles, I used Leupold for years and find the glass on NightForce scopes to be far superior to them. If your thinking about an Eotech, don’t hesitate. I have heard the complaints about the fact they turn off after 8 hours, has never been an issue, ran the Aimpoint M4 for a while, never shuts off, ever, it will stay on for a couple of years on a single battery, but, its to tall above the rail and feels a little awkward.

  7. I’ve considered the Eotech that uses the AA batteries to simplify our battery selection. We’ve tried to standardize all our needs to the 2A rechargeable type. But I’ve read about problems with recoil momentarily disconnecting the inline mounted AA batteries. Especially using larger 308 caliber rifles. Any experience with this problem? The cross mounted C123 battery type solves the problem but creates another type of battery to store. I haven’t heard much about rechargeable C123’s. Any advice?

  8. Elvis, if you search carefully, you can find rechargeable CR123 variants and chargers. See:http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=cr123+rechargeable+battery&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=30679238801&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13545476298866656810&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_1qkbuw2lct_b.
    The cross mount configuration was intended to eliminate inertia interrupts.

    Night Force are certainly excellent ‘scopes. I feel that the Leopold threaded eyepiece and objectives coupled with their excellent add ons such as the RainCote and Tenebraex to be more suited for our long term purposes. I’m curious, can the Night Force be equipped with a reticular objective obscurator? Ever fired a rifle in low light conditions without one?

    PR

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