One preppers survival kit/bug out bag system…..

Irish-7 was nice enough to share his survival kit/bug out bag system with all of Rourke’s Patriot’s – that’s you. He sent this in response to my article http://modernsurvivalonline.com/redoing-my-get-home-bags/.

 

Thanks Irish-7!!!

 – Rourke

 

 

As mentioned in my post, attached is the listing of the different size kits that I put together in the past 18 months. Some things to keep in mind:
 
1) My Survival Kits are backpack / rucksacks with mainly camping items.
2) My Bug Out Bags are mainly food and clothing, as if we would be staying indoors.
3) Webgear / Buttpack is my “Battle Rattle”, the pistol belt, vest type suspenders with ammo pouches (holding survival items because I attached the ammo cases to the belt, anyway. Also, canteens, and a buttpack (civilian fanny pack) that holds all kids of necessities.
4) Ruger 10/22 Takedown Rifle came with such a neat bag, with so much additional space, that I converted it to a survival kit.
5) S&W Governor Pistol Bag is a military map/photo case beefed up with additional survival items. The Survival Tin (mirrored after the British Special Air Service Survival Tine) is a Cabela’s wallet case filled with small goodies. I have the kit inside the Governor Bag.
6) To save time, I purchased self contained cans and bottles that were already filled with survival items. I deal with a company down your way, CH Kadels/BUDK/Kennesaw Cutlery. THEY HAVE GREAT STUFF!
 
Let me know if you need clarification. I did not write out my Every Day Carry. I was always one of these guys that had a ton of stuff in my pockets, way before I was a “prepper”. Thirty years in the Army afforded me more pockets (and reasons) to be prepared.  
 
Irish-7

SURVIVAL KIT CONTENTS-LARGE RUCKSACK

 

1.   BACKPACK – Large OD Green Rucksack from Active Duty in the Airborne Infantry

2.   MILITARY PONCHO (2) – Use for shelter. These are the old,Vietnamera, thick type.

3.   MILITARY SURVIVAL BLANKET – Vacuum sealed in aluminum foil

4.   MESS KIT – Includes fry pan, bowl, pot with handle, lid, cup & plate.

5.   M4/M1911 CLEANING KIT – Includes Plier Multi-tool

6.   HATCHET/ KNIFE SET – Reverse of blade is a hammer.

7.   TOILET PAPER – Roll of Cottonelle

8.   BABY WIPES – Pack of Huggies

9.   BUNGEE CORD – 1EACH 36”, 30”, 24” & 18”

10. TRAVEL KIT – 1 MALE, includes deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, etc

11. RAINJACKET – Lightweight, blue

12. PONCO – Lightweight, clear

13. GERBER MACHETE / SAW – With Case (Outside Ruck)

14. FLASHLIGHT – Right Angle with 2 D batteries.

15. CHEMLIGHTS – 1 EACH 12 hour blue, orange, green & yellow.

16. GARBAGE BAGS – 1 Contractor, 2 LG. Bags have multiple uses, ie: food/water storage, poncho

17. SWISS ARMY KNIFE – Huntsman model with large & small blades, SAW, scissors, can/bottle opener

18. EMERGENCY (SPACE) BLANKETS – 2 EACH, look like tin foil to me, but reflect body heat

19. MT HOUSE MEALS – 2 EACH, freeze dried, must add boiling water

20. ENTRENCHING TOOL – With case (Outside Ruck)

21. FIRE KIT – Self-made, contains 2 candles, magnifying glass, magnesium bar, waterproof match vial

22. WATERPROOF BOX – Whistle, Gorilla tape, Chapstick, sunscreen, lotion, mirror, Q-tips, H2O tabs

23. INSECT REPELLANT – Inside WP box

24. CRAVAT / BANDANNA – Several uses as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc.

25. SEWING KIT – Military type, with scissors, needles, buttons, thread and safety pins

26. FISHING KIT – Small, self-made, with line, hooks, bobber, etc

27. PARACHUTE CORD – Military, 550 type

28. CIGARETTES – 1 Pack of Marlboro Box

29. SNACK BAG – Contains Beef Jerky, Slim Jims, peanuts, Trail Mix & JOLT caffeine gum

30. HAND/BODY WARMERS – Disposable, 10 hour duration

31. FIRST AID KIT – Medium size, contents listing on bottom. ADDED: meds for pain, allergies, stomach

32. KNIFE SHARPENER

33. FAT RAT 2 QT CANTEEN – With case (Outside Ruck)

34. DUCT TAPE – (Outside Pocket)

35. LAXATIVE & PAIN MEDICATIONS – One month

36. METAL CUP – Marlboro

37. TENT STAKES & POLES – 5+3

38. DATREX FOOD BARS – 3600 calorie per bar

39. ELECTRICAL (CABLE) TIES – Mixed lengths, can be used as flex cuffs, too.

40. LEATHER GLOVES – Used with wool inserts in cold weather.

41. WATERPROOF BAG – Military issue, holding: towel, wash cloth, BDU & Fleece caps, poncho liner

42. AMMUNITON: 22 LR, for AR-7

43. AR-7 AIR FORCE SURVIVAL RIFLE – With 4 eight round magazines.

 

 

 

 

 

SURVIVAL KIT CONTENTS – MEDIUM PACK

 

1.   BACKPACK – Medium Size, National Guard Recruiting enticement, multi-pouch, ACU digital pattern

2.   MILITARY PONCHO – Use for shelter. There are also lightweight ponchos to wear.

3.   PONCHO LINER – BDU Pattern

4.   MESS KIT – Includes fry pan, bowl, pot with handle, lid, cup & plate.

5.   STAINLESS STEEL BOTTLE – 24 ounce capacity

6.   HATCHET – Reverse of blade is a hammer.

7.   TOILET PAPER –CampRoll

8.   BABY WIPES – Pack of Huggies

9.   BUNGEE CORD – 1 EACH 36”, 30”, 24” & 18”

10. TRAVEL KIT – 1 MALE, includes deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, etc

11. RAINJACKET – Lightweight, blue

12. PONCO – 2 EACH Lightweight, clear

13. FOLDING SAW – 9” Locking blade. Cuts through wood, plastic pipe, sheetrock or bone.

14. FLASHLIGHT –  1 Mini Maglite with 2 AA batteries and case, plus 1 small LED light

15. CHEMLIGHTS – 1 EACH 12 hour blue, orange, green & yellow.

16. GARBAGE BAGS – 2 XL Clear, 2 LG Dark. Bags have multiple uses, ie: food/water storage, poncho

17. SWISS ARMY KNIFE – Huntsman model with large & small blades, SAW, scissors, can/bottle opener

18. EMERGENCY (SPACE) BLANKETS – 1 EACH, look like tin foil to me, but reflect body heat

19. MT HOUSE MEALS – 2 EACH, freeze dried, must add boiling water

20. WATERPROOF CASE – Cell phone storage (or other, thin items)

21. FIRE KIT – Self-made, contains 2 candles, magnifying glass, magnesium bar, waterproof match vial

22. DRY BOX – tissues, electrical tape, Chapstick, sunscreen, cream, mirror, Q-tips, H2O tabs, soap

23. COMPASS – Cheap Lensatic (steal an Army compass)

24. BANDANNA or CRAVAT – Use as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc.

25. SEWING KIT – Military type, with scissors, needles, buttons, thread and safety pins

26. FISHING KIT – Small, self-made, with line, hooks, bobber, etc

27. PARACHUTE CORD – Military, 550 type, braided, condensed

28. WHISTLE / WP MATCH CONTAINER – 20 Safety matches & strike section of the box

29. SNACK BAG – Contains Beef Jerky, Slim Jims, peanuts, Trail Mix & JOLT caffeine gum

30. HAND/BODY WARMERS – Disposable, 10 hour duration

31. FIRST AID KIT – Medium size (Michael from Target) or Army Individual Kit (Matthew)

32. LOCK BLADE KNIFE – Switchblade 3.5”

32. MULTI-TOOL – Hammer type

33. DITTI-BAG

34. PLASTIC KNIFE/FORK/SPOON COMINATION SET

35. FOOTBALL – Small, rubber NG enlistment perk

36. HEADLAMP- With harness / strap

37. METAL CUP – Marlboro Coffee Cup

38. TENT STAKES – Plastic 2 EA 9” & 2 EA 12”

39. BIBLE – Small, pages can be used as fire starting material

40. IODINE BOTTLE – Antiseptic or water purification

41. DATREX FOOD BARS – 1800 calorie, can be broken into 200 calorie sections

42. BOTTLED WATER – 16.9 oz

43. AMMO–.12GA #00 Buck, slugs + .357MAG (Michael),380FMJ & 22LR (Matthew), 20GA&.380 (MOM)

44. LEATHER GLOVES –Outdoor“Garden”type

45. SOL BIVY – Similar to Space Blankets, but more durable, re-useable material. Rated to 50 DEG FHR

 

 

BUG OUT BAG OUT CONTENTS

 

 

1.   GYM BAG – Medium Size, multi-pouch, ACU digital pattern

2.   PONCHO LINER – BDU Pattern

3.   HATCHET / PRY BAR – Reverse of blade is a hammer.

4.   TOILET PAPER –CampRoll

5.   STAINLESS STEEL BOTTLE – 24 ounce capacity

6.   LEATHER GLOVES – Winter, lightly insulated

7.   DATREX FOOD BARS – 1800 calorie, can be broken into 200 calorie sections

8.   BABY WIPES – Pack of Huggies

9.   BANDANA – 2 EACH, Several uses as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc.

10. TRAVEL KIT – MALE or FEMALE, includes deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, etc

11. RAINJACKET – Lightweight

12. PONCO – Lightweight

13. EMERGENCY (SPACE) BLANKETS – 1 EACH, look like tin foil to me, but reflect body heat

14. FLASHLIGHT –  1 Mini Maglite with 2 AA batteries and case, plus 1 small LED light

15. CHEMLIGHTS – 1 EACH 12 hour blue, orange, green & yellow.

16. GARBAGE BAGS – 2 XL Clear, 2 LG Dark. Bags have multiple uses, ie: food/water storage, poncho

17. SWISS ARMY KNIFE – Huntsman model with large & small blades, SAW, scissors, can/bottle opener

18. BOTTLED WATER – 16.9 oz

19. MT HOUSE MEALS – 2 EACH, freeze dried, must add boiling water

20. EMERGENCY BLANKETS (reusable)  – 1 EACH

21. LOCK OR FIXED BLADE KNIFE – Switchblade 3.5”, Fixed Blade 7” or Longer

22. MULTI-TOOL

23. WATER FILTER

24.CAMPTOWEL– Small yellow

25. SEWING KIT – Military type, with scissors, needles, buttons, thread and safety pins

26. PARACHUTE CORD – Military, 550 type, braided, condensed

27. AMMUNITION – 12GA “00” Buck, slugs + 357MAG (Michael), .20GA + 380ACP (Denise) &.22LR (Matthew)

28. ACU SHIRT

29. ACU TROUSERS

30. BASEBALL or PATROL (ACU/BDU) CAP

30. SWEATSHIRT

31. SOCKS & UNDERWEAR IN ZIPLOCK BAG

32. WINTER CAP

33. GORILLA or EXTREME TAPE

34. KNIFE SHARPENER

35. MONOCULAR / BINOCULARS

36. FRUIT ENERGY BARS

37. SMALL NOTEBOOK / PEN / PENCIL

38. RADIO

39. SURVIVAL / FIRST AID MANUAL

40. WATER BOTTLE KIT CONTAINING: H2O PURE TABS, HAND WARMER, PONCHO, SPACE BLANKET, MATCHES, LIGHTER, SMALL FLASHLIGHT, BATTERIES, WHISTLE, D-RING, MULTI-TOOL, 1ST AID KIT

 

 

ADDITIONAL ITEMS (MIKE ONLY):

 

WINCHESTER COMBO PACK: 10x.45LC + 10x.410 PDX, MIXED .380 FMJ RDs (30)

1 DAY’S MEDS – ROTATED 13 SEP 12

SEIKO AUTOMATIC DIVER’S WATCH – BLACK or BLUE

1 PACK OF MARLBORO BOX

 

 

 

 

SURVIVAL KIT (WEB GEAR / BUTTPACK)

 

 

1.   BUTTPACK – Black (Square) or Sand (Tubular) military LBE.

2.   MILITARY 1 QT CANTEEN – 2 EA with cover.

3.   TOILET PAPER – Roll of Cottonelle, pack of wipes in ziplock bags.

4.   PONCO – Lightweight, disposable.

5.   FLASHLIGHT – Small LED or Mini Maglite with 2 AA batteries and case.

6.   CHEMLIGHTS – 4 EACH 12 hour blue, orange, green & yellow.

7.   GARBAGE BAG – LG Dark. Bags have multiple uses, ie: food/water storage, poncho.

8.   SWISS ARMY KNIFE – Huntsman model with large & small blades, saw, scissors, can/bottle opener.

9.   EMERGENCY (SPACE) BLANKETS – 1 EA

10. WATERPROOF CASE – Made for cell phone (or other, thin items). Now holds whistle & signal mirror.

11. FIRE KIT – Self-made, contains 3 candles, magnifying glass, magnesium bar, waterproof match vial.

12. WATERPROOF POUCH – Fire Kit, electrical tape, First Aid Kit, small hunting knife, fishing kit.

13. COMPASS – Cheap Lensatic (sand buttpack LBE), military lensatic (black buttpack LBE).

14. CRAVAT / BANDANA – Several uses as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc.

15. SEWING KIT – Small, with needles, thread and safety pins.

16. FISHING KIT – Small, self-made, with line, hooks, bobber, etc.

17. PARACHUTE CORD – Military, 550 type.

18. SNACK BAG – Contains Beef Jerky, Slim Jims, peanuts, Trail Mix & JOLT caffeine gum.

19. HAND/BODY WARMERS – Disposable, 10 hour duration.

20. FIRST AID KIT – Small size, ADDED: 1 day of meds for pain, stomach.

21. PLIER / MULTI-TOOL–Hammer type (no needle nose) with file, saw, can opener, knife & x-tip scrdrv.

22. SOAP BAR – Small, from hotel.

23. WIRE SAW – Affixed to electrical tape.

24. MILITARY PISTOL BELT – With pistol holster for SUV handgun (Ruger Security-6 .357 MAG).

25. CASE, SMALL ARMS AMMO – 2 EA, made for M16/M4 rifle magazines.(Use for SUV wpns ammo).

26. SUSPENDERS, LBE, PADDED VEST TYPE – With 4 pockets (M4 mag size, now holding supplies).

27. SOL Bivy – Re-useable (durable) Space blanket ($30 model in sand buttpack LBE, $16 in black LBE).

28. SOS FOOD BAR – 3600 Calorie. Individual bars shrink-wrapped in aluminum foil. (2 days of food)

29. LEATHER GLOVES – Cheap, garden type. Will work as shell to cover military wool inserts.

30. SLEEP CAP – Fleece, (Type issued with Intermediate and ECW Sleeping Bags).

 

 

 

 

SURVIVAL KIT (RUGER 10/22 TAKEDOWN BAG)

 

 

  1. RUGER 10/22 TAKEDOWN RIFLE WITH BAG
  2. SLING MADE OF PARACHUTE CORD – Military, 550 type.
  3. BX-25 MAGAZINES – 3 Each, loaded. (Outside Pouch)
  4. MILITARY PONCHO – Camouflage, woodland pattern
  5. NAVY SEALS FIXED BLADE KNIFE – Full tang, 5” blade.
  6. 200 ROUNDS OF .22 LONG RIFLE – 1x100rd box + 2x50rd boxes.
  7. KNIFE SHARPENER – Coarse and fine ceramic edges.
  8. PACK OF JOLT GUM – To prevent caffeine headaches, when beverages unavailable.
  9. SOS FOOD BAR – 3600 Calorie. Individual bars shrink-wrapped in aluminum foil.
  10. MILLENIUM FRUIT BARS – 2 Each
  11. PAIN MEDICATIONS – 1 Day
  12. WATER PURIFICATIONS TABLETS – 8 Each
  13. PLIER / MULTI-TOOL– saw, can opener, knife & x-tip screwdriver. (Outside)
  14. LOCK BLADE KNIFE – With case, part of a set (multi-tool)
  15. D-RING – National Guard Recruiting enlistment gift Outside)
  16. M16 RIFLE CLEANING KIT – (Outside)
  17. ZIPLOCK BAGS – For contents of Survival Canteen
  18. BANDANA – Several uses as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc.
  19. SURVIVAL CANTEEN – Containing: 10  band-aids, whistle/compass, flashlight with AA batteries, space blanket, poncho, mini pocket knife and a box of waterproof matches.
  20. SURVIVAL CAN – Containing: whistle/compass, box of waterproof matches,candle, surgical blade, 36’ duct tape, 3 safety pins, 5 wound closure strips, 18×12” foil, ziplock bag, 50’ fishing line, 4 hooks, 4 sinkers, 8” snare wire and a survival guide.

 

 

SURVIVAL KIT (GOVERNOR .410GA/45LC/.45ACP PISTOL BAG)

 

  1. GOVERNOR .410 GA/.45 LC/.45 ACP REVOLVER WITH PASSPORT NYLON HIP HOLSTER
  2. MILITARY MAP / PHOTO CASE – Commonly known as a “Fag Bag”.
  3. SPEEDLOADER CARRIER–4 EA, 3 loaded with 2×6-rd .45LC, 1 has 4×6-rd .45 ACP moon clips.
  4. SPEEDLOADER – 7 EA, mixed .45 LC 250 grain jacketed hollow points or 250 GR lead flat nose.
  5. NRA FIXED BLADE KNIFE – Plastic handle, 3” blade.
  6. NRA FOLDING BLADE KNIFE – Wood handle, 2.5” blade.
  7. WINCHESTER PDX .410 GA SHOT SHELLS – 15 rounds (3 Plates and 12 BBs per shell).
  8. PACK OF JOLT GUM – To prevent caffeine headaches, when beverages unavailable.
  9. SOS FOOD BAR – 3600 Calorie. Individual bars shrink-wrapped in aluminum foil.
  10. BANDANA – 2 EA. Several uses as bandage, sweatband, water filter, towel, etc)
  11. OTIS M16 RIFLE CLEANING KIT – Added large patches and cleaning rag.
  12. LED FLASHLIGHT – AAA Batteries.
  13. PARACORD BRACELET – Homemade, 6” long (about 6’ of 550 cord).
  14. WALTHER .380 PPK/S MAGAZINES – 2 EA. For EDC pistol in my pocket
  15. SURVIVAL TIN (IN ZIPLOCK BAG) – Homemade, from Cabela’s wallet box, containing: mixed size  band-aids, aluminum whistle, mini multi-tool, /compass, Mag-Lite flashlight with AAA batteries, space blanket, mini lock blade knife, sewing kit, fire steel/striker, lighter, book of matches, alcohol prep pads, water purification tablets (4), Tool Logic Card with compass, magnifying glass, can opener, screwdriver and a small knife blade .
  16. 1 DAY OF MEDICATION

 

————————————————————————

Thoughts?

– Rourke


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12 Comments

  1. “12GA #00 Buck, slugs + .357MAG (Michael),380FMJ & 22LR (Matthew), 20GA&.380 (MOM)” as well as .45LC, .410 and .223.

    I would consider at least looking at streamlining this. Either everybody is carrying a ton of different types of ammo or via possible events you could end up with guns and bullets that don’t fit each other. Ditching the .45LC/.410 in favor of another .357 mag would be a good start. Could you either teach/ train Momma to shoot a 12 gauge or maybe switch to 20?

  2. I look at these kits and as I continue to pack and redine ours and I am starting to get concerned with how it could all be carried. It seems like there will be too much bulk or weight to effectively move around especially in a hostile bug out type scenerio. Plus when you have multiple bags set up, what if noone else is where you are but will be meeting up with you such as wife and kids, etc. The kits here are set up very nice and I got a lot of great ideas I am not knocking them at all I just was wondering if this is just something I have to be aware of or is there any suggestions such as staging equipment in other neutral locations that would help. I am still fairly new to this level of prepardness. Sometimes I wonder how it come to some of your minds. I am assuming that a lt of it is with military training. I like how he has a bag for different situations and it has made me rethink my vehicle bhag. GREAT ARTICLE. Thanks for sharing your lists.

  3. Where is the wheelbarrow? Just kidding. I like concept of complimentary kits or levels of kits. The base level contains essentials, the intermediate level is intended to be caried in addition to the base level and it rounds out the supplies to something that would suffice for a few days in the wild. The advanced kit would be combined with the base level and intermediate supplies to provide everyhing needed for weeks or months without civilization. The problem with creating these kits come in when you actually carry them. It is a tough job to whittle the essentials down to something that can be easily carried when moving fast. The Indians and early woodsman without horses carried light packs and knew how to make the most of their gear. Too many of these “kit lists” read like a wish list created by someone who had money but little real experience. Then too every situation places a premium on different “essentials”. I like ultralight hiking and know from experience that a pack becomes the enemy after 15 miles or so. For those who shun ultralight hiking because it doesn’t include everything you think you need; look up Andrew Skurka. His hiking abilities speak for itself. Some of his accomplishments border on unbelievable. His feats have created a new word “skurking” (meaning moving quickly over great distances) which arguably is the intent when bugging out to get away from dangerous situations.

  4. Perhaps the ammo line should have been deleted. I did not intend to leave names on the packing lists. Anyway, each person’s bag has some additional rounds for their assigned weapon. For example, M is carrying a Mossberg 930 SPX and Smith & Wesson Model 19. Consequently, in his bag there are 2 boxes (5 rds per box) of #00 buck, a 5 rd box of slugs and a 50 rd box of .357. Mom has a similar load of .20 GA for her Remington 870, but has 50 .380 FMJ for her handgun. Right now, Matthew has a Ruger 10/22 rifle and 22/45 pistol. He has 2 50 rd boxes of .22 LR ammo. I am sure that I mentioned before that the Survival Backpack and Bug Out Bags are for 2 different scenarios. Only in a rare “Quickly Leave Home Forever” situation, would anyone in the family be taking both bags at the same time. I have 2 collapsible hand trucks to carry the Bug Out Bags in the even odder event we were walking away from home forever. I’ve been using the S&W Governor .45LC/.410GA for EDC for almost a year. If we descend into a SHTF/WROL crisis, I will go back to my Colt Gold Cup .45 auto as my main handgun (in a holster on my web gear). The Governor will be a back up gun (just loaded with .410 GA PDX) on a tactical leg holster. We all have a Main Battle Rifle or shotgun and primary handgun. We also have a back up rifle / shotgun and pistol (cached).

  5. As my name implies, I have a few years under my belt, but I can still carry a 30-40 lb pack a ways. My wife on the other hand can only carry 10 lbs max and I am not sure how far or how long. I see all of these well thought out kits as a shopping list for the bare essentials of survival packed all in one larger pack, mine, and one small pack, my wife’s. As I think about this I think I have to keep my pack or ruck to 30 lbs so I can carry my wife’s eventually. A good bug out kit makes sense as a few days, keep your head down and wait for the flash to be over, or natural disaster situation.

    I am all for being well armed/provisioned, ample ammo being critical. I feel sticking to ammo that you can find (is commonly used by gov’t) makes better sense to keep the weight down. I do like the AR-7 in the event I must abandon something. It is a light weight effective tool.

    I have the problem of living in a 75-mile long, high pop. density strip of geography that will be quite difficult to navigate for the first few days after a SHTF event, maybe impossible.

    THe objective is survival and so many forget to factor in the people like my wife and I at our age ( a little older). I intend to do my darnedest to survive but I must be able to handle the load.

    Thanks Irish-7! You gave all of us a lot to consider and a ton of good information and options.

  6. I did shoot the first AR-7 that I bought in July 2011. In fact, the whole family did. It performed well, with the conditions that were determined by the range. It did not jam at all, and I did not use much lube. The range was small. The farthest targets were about 25 meters. We were not allowed to set up our own targets, then check the holes and see how well we did. There were ropes with junk hanging at the far end of the range. There were times that you could tell that you hit the target. There were times where I wondered if the object was spinning because of the previous round fired. Sorry, I cannot give an honest opinion on the accuracy of the weapon. I am pretty confident that if a person was approaching my family with the intent to do us harm, that he would not have made it. My first AR-7 was an odd color, silver/gray(ish). The second was black, with an orange front sight post. This weapon is easier to aim. I kept the black rifle and cached the silver one. I am very glad that I bought this weapon system. I think it is a super idea to have a small, lightweight, portable rifle that fits into a backpack. I concur with the late, great, Jerry Ahern. He said that everyone should carry an AR-7 in their vehicle. While we’re talking about Jerry, I am compelled to give him credit with helping me with my Bug Out Bag list. I am not the loyal fan that Rourke was. But, I bought one of his books, SURVIVE: Disaster Handbook(?), and enjoyed it so much that I took many of his suggestions. Also, I will be the first to admit that our survival rucksacks are packed rather full. My wife and I may find that they contain too much to walk very far. I have spinal conditions from parachute landings on my first tour of the Army and she has a bad foot. But, I prefer to have to equipment listed, then move stuff to the hand truck, or ditch the excess items altogether, as opposed to taking off without something we may end up needing. I have not had much success in lobbying the family to take a trial run around the neighborhood. Sorry, I am rambling. Before I close, I do want to thank Rourke for posting my work and express gratitude for all your input.

  7. I’m with GWTW – where’s the wheelbarrow. Do you plan on taking all of these packs or just one based on an assessment of the current situation? What situation would warrant the large bag versus the medium bag? Could you move at a fast walk for 2 or 3 miles? In 1980, I broke my knee in 7 places on jump 367 (C130, 1,200 feet, into the trees), so I too have a limit on distance and speed.

    If you plan to take all of them, you’re a walking hardware store (hatchet/knife set, Gerber machete/saw, entrenching tool, hatchet, folding saw, and a wire saw not counting all of the knives and multi-tools). Why do you need multiple ponchos and rain jackets followed with military survival blankets and emergency space blankets followed with biveys? I counted 6 ponchos, 3 rain jackets, 10 blankets, and 2 bivys. Even for 4 people, you have enough rain gear for a monsoon season!

    If these are really just simple bug out bags why do you need so much weapon cleaning and knife sharpening equipment? If you drop your M-4 in the mud take your water bottle and flush it out – it will fire just fine with a little rust on the receiver. Better yet, get a Mini-14 or M1A or an AK variant which are less likely to get tempermental in bad weather. Even a lever action 30-30 will crank out rounds when it gets full of gunk. The bad guys won’t get too flustered if your firearm isn’t ready for inspection. If your knife gets a little dull the bambie steaks will still be edible if they aren’t perfectly sliced. If I counted correctly you have about 16 different knife blades – are you planning on opening a sushi restaurant after you bug out (humor intended)?

    And, it seems you have a lot of redundant items – sewing kits, bungee cords, duct tape, etc. If all of this stuff is just to support 4 people, I think you would be better off ditching the pioneer tools (unless you really do plan to hike into the boonies and build a log cabin) and adding more immediate need items – medicine (I carry at least 2 months, even in my GHB), water purification, food, vitamins, batteries (did not see any spares in your list), cotton balls with vaseline (starting fires with wet wood), even a deck of cards or some dice.

    In most instances you should be able to maintain a reasonably healthy exisitence for a month with a 30 to 40 pound pack filled with priorities – shelter, food, water, fire, first aid. Of course, that doesn’t take into account extreme cold, desert conditions, or combat situations.

    FYI, don’t smoke at night. A glowing cigarette makes a great target for the bad guys and even in calm weather it leaves an easily trackable odor.

  8. In response to Harry’s critique, the following information is provided:
    I honestly believed that I had explained the difference between our Survival Backpack/Rucksacks and Bug Out Bags too many times and that the members of this site would be annoyed at me repeating myself. But, I guess I was wrong. So, I will say it once more. The backpacks and Bug Out Bags are for different scenarios. The rucks are geared toward prolonged time outdoors. The Bug Out Bags are more for a situation where we left home quickly, ahead of a blizzard, hurricane or evacuating a toxic spill (we have frequent accidents on a nearby highway). For the most part, the BOBs are set up as if we would be staying indoors. There are some outdoor survival items, but they are mainly food and clothes. I used the list from the Jerry Ahern book SURVIVE…. The BOBs are pretty much the same for each of us, with different clothing and ammo. The rucksacks have similar items, but not identical. I have a large military ruck, the same one that I used in the 82ND and 509TH Airborne. My wife an kids have a medium pack. It is a digital ACU pattern with multiple pockets. National Guard Recruiters give these away as enlistment perks.
    I have multiple degenerative, bulging and herniated disks in my back from parachute landings years ago. Regardless, I run 5 miles 3 or 4 times per week. I do a light barbell workout (mainly dumbbells & cables) on the days that I don’t run. I take several medications every single day, just to allow me simple movements that healthy folks take for granted. Bottom line, I believe I can carry my ruck to get away from danger.
    As far as the hardware goes, I am not going to dig any holes with the machete or hatchet. I am not cutting down any trees with the E-tool. The back of the machete has a saw that is capable of cutting down trees. The hatchet is mainly for splitting wood and driving stakes. Not everyone has a machete / saw. The ones that don’t have a folding saw. I would like to think that we will always be together. The survival backpacks are set up in event we are not.
    As stated next to the description, military ponchos are used for building shelter. The rain jacket and ponchos described as “lightweight” are the thin, cellophane type that you throw in your pocket before attending a sporting event. They are good for a few uses, then get trashed. I suspect that the Emergency (Space) Blankets will last the same, maybe 2 or 3 times. The SOL Bivy is more durable, but is only rated to 50 degrees. I hardly think that I went overboard with either rain gear or blankets.
    We have a lot of knives, I agree. I did not originate this concept, though. While conducting my research, I read countless times “You never have enough knives”. I also concur with your statement about redundancy. Again, these packs and bags are for different situations. I followed advice from several seasoned preppers who adamantly stated “2 is 1 and 1 is none”.
    Truthfully, I thought that I answered some of the critique on these packing lists on previous posts. You remember, Harry, earlier this month when you recommended using a garden cart to carry all your stuff around? I am not advocating that anyone pack the stuff that I did. I admit that I am relatively new to the prepping community (March 2011). All of the information that I posted was recommended by alleged survival experts: John McCann, “Lofty” Wiseman, Mykel Hawke and Jerry Ahern. Also, I have spent countless days in the great outdoors as an Airborne and Mechanized Infantryman and an Armored Cavalry Scout. I submitted these lists for the benefit of folks new to the prepping crowd. All that anyone needs to take from this information is that these items fit in the containers listed.
    “Don’t smoke at night”. Really? When I was in the 2/75 Ranger BN, they taught us how to smoke at night. Cut a small hole in your PC, then put your cap on the ground. Slip the cigarette through the hole so that only the filter sticks out the top. Reach your hand under the cap and light it. Keep real low to the ground and puff away. I may have cheated in the field, but I never smoked at night on any combat operation. I think that most guys could wait until the next morning.

  9. Whoa Ace, no need to get defensive about your gear list and reasoning behind it. I simply commented that for a group of 4 people in a bug out or survival scenario you seem to have a lot of redundancies. If it works for you – great. However, if you don’t want folks questioning your reasoning, perhaps to glean a little better understanding which they could then apply to their own situation, don’t hang your laundry out for all to see.

    Further, I comment on the immediate post with the assumption that Rourke’s newest readers may not have had the time to delve into previous posts from weeks and months back. “I began to learn quite alot once I discovered that I didn’t already know everything, and wasn’t too good to learn it from anyone with more experience” – my first platoon sergeant, RIP.

    My set up is also based on multiple bags and packs, but they don’t overlap. My get home bag has some basics, my bug out bag has a wider variety of stuff, and my full pack and chest rig has even more. One builds on the next. I don’t put ponchos, sewing kits, and duct tape in each bag level. I grab bag 1, bag 2, bag 3, etc in order until I run out of time or space and then di di mau over the horizon. I wasn’t aware that your concept was based on excluding one set of gear in favor of a different set up. As you noted , your selection of which pack to grab is situational dependant. That seems a bit silly, but again if it works for you – yippee.

    My recommendation for the garden cart was based on the supposition that most groups (probably 6 or more members) would be better served if one or two of their members pulled a cart with all of their gear while the remainder walked unencumbered except for a basic weapon load. The cart would also allow a group which has extremely young, old, or injured members to continue moving at close to normal walking speed. Not knowing your locale, terrain, road/trail access, distance to BOL, and other factors, I could only conjecture if a cart would allow two adults and two kids (I assume your’s are not of adult age) to move further or faster with suitable security. The cart suggestion was based on a true SHTF situation where there is no motorized transport and your group has to move their “stuff” through potentially contested terrain.

    I’ve read all of the “alleged” experts as well – some of their stuff I wholeheartedly agree with, some I think is tripe. Rourke provides us a format to discuss these issues and determine what works best for our situation and to allow others to provide feedback (positive and negative). I like your idea of including garbage bags and chemlights (hadn’t thought of those for one of my packs). I think having multiple ponchos, bivys, blankets, and rain jackets in a basic bug out or survival bag is a waste of space. To each his own thoughts be true.

    Since I don’t smoke, I never learned the tricks to hide it only the tricks to let the bad guys know they weren’t successful at hiding it.

    BTW – thanks for serving.

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