Guest Post: Scat Cat or Defeating the Feral Feline

By Joseph Parish

Let’s take some time to discuss a somewhat perplexing issue that seems to irk many people residing in residential areas. That dilemma materializes in the form of wild feral cats hanging around ones yards and spraying at every location imaginable. In most cases these felines have been cast off by their owners and the ex-pet is merely trying to survive.

If you reside in the urban environment and are fortunate enough to have a yard, than you know exactly what I am talking about here. I am astonished that so many pet owners will discard a pet and think nothing immoral about it. My initial reaction to this is that these people have their audacity turning loose to the wild a pet which they rightfully should have taken the best of care for. This spraying is particularly frustrating if you happen to have small children that frequently romp and play within your yard. I get exceptionally irritated with those people who believe that this is an acceptable behavior for disposing of an unwanted pet.

The problem as I see it is not the cat since the animal is merely doing what comes natural for it. No, we can’t blame the cat but we certainly can place the appropriate blame upon the previous owners of the animals. In cases such as this the property owner begins to wonder what recourse they may have in this situation and that my friend is the purpose of this article. Immediately several quick possibilities come to mind but neither the use of expensive cayenne pepper nor an electrified wire fence would be too ideal in this issue.

The commonly encountered problem with feral cats is that people simply do not want them in their yards. With that thought in mind let’s review a few products and techniques which can assist you in keeping these stray cats out of your yard and at bay.

The first thing that I would like to mention is a motion activated lawn sprinkler system. This sprinkler uses infra-red in order to detect when an animal enters a designated territory. When the feline enters the infra-red field the system is activated and that forces the sprinkler to shoot out a sudden spurge of water for several moments in the direction of the detected animal. This frightens the cat and they quickly learn not to enter your yard. In a matter of time you will find that the sprinkler would no longer be necessary. The major downfall of this setup is that it will not work in the wintertime. During cold conditions the water would freeze and even if the water is still in a liquid state it would be cruel for the animals to splash them with ice water in the dead of winter. You would be better to employ this system prior to winter while the weather is still warm. By the approach of winter the cats will be well trained. To find such systems do an internet search for an item known as “Spray Away” which is manufactured by Havahart. The price ranges approximately $70 dollars.

The next item that I bring to the table is an ultrasonic device which contains a motion sensor which when triggered will emit a high-frequency alarm that is heard only to cats. Annoying for the cat – by all means harmful to the felines – not in the least. The downfall with any sort of ultrasonic device is that you must ensure that you have sufficient quantities installed to cover the complete area that you are trying to exclude the feral cats from. An excellent item of this nature is called “CatStop,” which costs about $49 dollars. According to the manufactures data this repellant will cover 340 square feet. The device can be employed in any weather and an added bonus for this item is that it will work equally well with other small animals as well.

The last resource at our disposal that I will cover is scented repellants. You usually have your choose in a naturally-based product or a chemically-based repellant. Since the active chemical in the repellent is methylnonylketone you should not use it around food crops. Of all the above chosen the use of scented propellants are the least effective.

One plant of particular success is the Coleus-Canina plant. This is considered a weed in most European nations and has been nicknamed the “Scardy-Cat” plant. Its effectiveness is based upon the odor it gives off which is highly offensive to cats. Humans do not even detect an odor at all. They should be planted three feet apart surrounding the area to be protected.

There you have it folks, three ways to rid your yard of feral cats. Good luck in your quest.

www.survival-training.info


20 survival items ebook cover

Like what you read?

Then you're gonna love my free PDF, 20 common survival items, 20 uncommon survival uses for each. That's 400 total uses for these innocent little items!

Just enter your primary e-mail below to get your link. This will also subscribe you to my newsletter so you stay up-to-date with everything: new articles, ebooks, products and more!



By entering your email, you agree to subscribe to the Modern Survival Online newsletter. We will not spam you.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

7 Comments

  1. In some areas the local humane society offers a catch/neuter/release system. They offer you live traps when you can then bring the cat in for free neutering. Then you release the cat. Why in heavens name would you do that? Cause cats do offer some benefits and neutering the cat helps reduce some of the annoying cat behavior. Cats will form clans and keep other feral cats out of an area. (Just like a gang. lol) And since ‘your’ cats are now not pumping out babies all the time, in a year or so the size of the clan will diminish. This program has been wildly successful in the communities who have adopted it. However since cats do have to go to the restroom, like all God’s creatures, the devices you mentioned would help with that.

  2. One further consideration – feral animals may have rabies, so act accordingly. Just be aware that not all local animal control agencies, laws, and regulations may have your and your family’s safety foremost in mind. Increasingly it seems not just people out in the sticks are on their own.

  3. A couple very effective , mostly-legal (depending on your location) and humane (you won’t hurt the cats) options, that saved me a LOT of annoyance at my old house:

    Hit your local fireworks stand on July 5th, when everything is on clearance and pick up some ‘cracker balls’ or ‘poppers’ (lightweight paper balls that make a minor ‘CRACK’ when thrown on the pavement.. sometimes) and a wrist-braced slingshot (which you should have anyway)

    Don’t aim directly for the cat. They are furry, so actually hitting them with one would have about the same effect as having a housefly land on them. Aim for something hard, right behind the feral pest. That one won’t be back for a few days. 3-4 ‘treatments’ tend to send them elsewhere, on a fairly permanent basis. Works on ‘possums, too.

    If there is vacant land a distance away that is available for ‘guerrilla gardening’ (or if you have a neighbor you really dislike), turn the ground over in Spring, add some fertilizer, and seed heavily with catnip and catmint seed. This solution worked well until they built a ‘tot lot’ on my old catnip patch.

    I had better go…… my cat is lookin’ at me funny 🙂

  4. White vinegar works well too… I use a 50/50 and spray after it rains. A few squirts here and there is enough. I use it more for my deck than a yard though.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*