From the Desk of John Rourke – March 16th, 2015

Selling off all my airsoft stuff. No time to play and taking up so much room. Need more trigger time – – on real guns.

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If I had the money I would open up a shooting range in my area. There are very few places to go and they all have too many restrictions. No drawing from a holster. No rapid fire shooting(must have two seconds between rounds). One place is pistol only. Another only has one rifle range. It would make a killing.

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I never served in the military and it is one of my biggest regrets. I am a huge supporter of the military and they deserve everyones utmost respect.  Lately I have been seeing more and more instances where ex-military members are posting demeaning things to those who never served  in a very condescending way. Disappointing.

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FYI – I have been using a Samsung Galaxy Note 4 phone for the past couple weeks – awesome. Love it.

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I sat down and watch all three Jurassic Park movies over the weekend – as well as King Kong. All great movies though Jurassic Park 2 was my least favorite.

how to bug in

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Hope everyone has a great week!!

 

 

 


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18 Comments

  1. You should have no regrets about not being in the military. I was in from 1970 to 74 Did not get drafted. Enlisted did one tour in Nam but I never held anything against anyone who did not serve. There are other ways like being a good citizen and patriot as you are. Granted there are a few small minded ones who think otherwise, but that’s their cross to bear, life is to short. What we have to worry about now is if our country can stand another year and a half with the present regime!

  2. I too regret not joining, but in 1971, I new where I would be in 8 weeks, the jungles of Viet Nam and I didn’t want any part of that. My draft lottery number was 285 so I wasn’t too worried about that. But there is a comradery between those that served that you get no where else. I watched my Son join the US Army and do a year in Afghanistan, I was never so proud and so scared at the same time.

    Tex

  3. Rourke- you and anyone else who hasnt been in the military. There are different paths for each person.Our son wanted to serve and also wanted to be in theFBI
    or CIA . He passed all the physical tests and did ok on the written but wasnt accepted due to his inability to take tests in a timed way. He always had this issue since childhood. This and his asthma kept him out. We always supported our veterans even if we were against a particular war at the time. We send letters of support and care packages now and have been since the Vietnam war. Thanks to all who did serve and are serving. Arlene

  4. As a Vietnam vet the only people I have disdain for are those of my generation who ran and hid from the draft. It was not a choice for me but a duty. Today it is a choice for young people to make. I appreciate your support of the military and veterans and hope you will continue to put your information out there for us.

  5. Anyone who is disrespectful to someone for not serving does not deserve respect in return. This is the rule of life no matter what path you travel. Treat other as you want to be treated.

    As far as our professional army goes, those who profess to be lovers of the Constitution seem to forget that a standing army of more than two years is prohibited. The founders made this point clear they did not trust a professional standing army. It should also be note that they did not apply the same restriction to the Navy which is why the Marine Corps fall under them. It was not until after the Civil War we started to maintain a land based military force at the federal level outside of the West Point officer corps. Prior to that the responsibility was that of each state’s militia. Remember even the Civil War was fought using state militias under federal control. Just food for thought!!!

  6. It’s a shame for ex or current military to act in a demeaning manner towards anyone, period.

    As for regrets…let go of them. I recently retired after 26 years and looking back it’s just like anything else, ups and downs. It was fun but not worth giving up your own personal freedom and having to work for folks that are career folks that would throw you under the bus to further their career.

    As for the range, right on brother…nothing better than being able to throw anything down range without an owner having a fit.

  7. Bill K.

    My father was a WWII veteran and saw too much in the European theatre. One of his brothers lost fingers and toes a few years later at a place called Chosin. When the Viet Nam draft began in ernest I remember dad saying he would take me to Canada if I wished. He and his brother had been talking about Korea. I think dad realized this country didn’t have the political will to adequately prosecute a foreign civil war. My number was also about 285 the year I turned 18 so I was ‘safe.’ Nevertheless I became involved in an officer program and served our country for more than two decades in one organization or another. In retrospect, I think dad wanted me to have an option and left the choice up to me. I reserve my ire for the likes of Hanoi Jane.

    There are a host of ways to serve. Serve on a jury, vote responsibly, run for public office, pay taxes with honesty, etc. There are many paths toward a responsible walk with integrity and honesty.

    PR

  8. I’ve known a lot of Vets who came home from Vietnam with the opinion that no one should ever be involved in the activities they were subjected to. These guys are all like Panhandle Rancher’s dad, advising all young men to avoid military service. Of course, these are the same type who were called a danger to the government during the short lived militia movement of the 1990’s. A very intelligent and successful gentleman who survived his “tour of Normandy” gave us a paper copy of this speech. In his opinion, the worst part of being in the army, even worse than seeing thousands of people die, was finding out the whole country had been deceived.

    Smedley Butler on Interventionism
    — Excerpt from a speech delivered in 1933, by Major General Smedley Butler, USMC.

    “War is just a racket. A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of people. Only a small inside group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few at the expense of the masses.”

    http://fas.org/man/smedley.htm

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