From the Desk of John Rourke – July 14th, 2015

This will be short. Had a thunderstorm last night and lost power for a bit.

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Over the weekend I played around with my new Sun Oven. It is an incredible piece of equipment. The owner of SunOven.com and myself will be holding a webinar within the next few weeks. I am negotiating with them to try to get a really special offer for MSO readers.

So cool.

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Over the past several weeks I have been a proponent of GearBest.com. They offer a wide variety if products – some related to preparedness and many that do not. What is very attractive are there prices. GearBest.com is based in China – where most of the products are made. I just received a Ganzo G704 pocket knife which I bought for around $15 with free shipping. What a bargain. This is a really nice knife. I will take some pictures and post later on.

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It appears that the military is going to lift the ban on transgenders from serving.

It keeps getting better and better.

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Pellet guns. I am beginning to see a much more important role for them than I have previously. In a long term SHTF event they could be very useful for gathering food via squirrels and rabbits. Pellets are so inexpensive and so many can be stored in very little space. A small investment would allow other firearms and ammunition supplies to be extended greatly.

 

 

 

 

 


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11 Comments

  1. If you research Pellet Guns – please consider many have only scope sights and I would like to know if there are iron sights that can be mounted
    on the barrel also an adapter for a picatinny rail would be nice.

  2. Disgusting. Clearly he is trying to humiliate and tear up our military. Evil man….evil, evil man! You know…eternity is a long time to burn.

  3. Capt. Michaels, can this be part of an agenda to have UN forces instead of American forces defend this country as our military would be to small to do anything to protect us?

  4. I have several pellet guns. They are great for small game, pest control, plinking, fun. They also help you with marksmanship: trigger control, breaking etc. Extremely economical. Remember the K.I.S.S. rule (Keep It Simple Stupid) for me I stick with Pumps and Spring powered. Less parts, remember in s SHTF or WROL, you will be your own logistics person. CO2 and High Pressure compress air require more $$ and skill to maintain. My daughters now 27 & 28, each have there own pellet rifle (Crossman 760) they like them and can hit pretty much what they see, My eldest has low powered scope and my youngest has a red dot. I keep an inventory of (1.77 & .22) cal in stock.

  5. I lived with pellet guns for a very long time .. they could be used in town .. but they could be learned on and used “A lot” by young shooters .. like I was then .. I’ve killed ducks and geese as well as rabbits and squirrels.. countless bullfrogs. turtles. and snakes .. all edible .. head/eye shots makes it all work .. just takes practice.. Crossman pump guns .. still have one .. I will say that I am considering another make .. the plunger in the compression tube keeps failing and it is not repairing well .. and that is 3 so far.. so I am looking for a brand that I can buy parts for in advance.. If anyone knows of one that repairs well … I definitely liek the idea .. some of the best days I spent was wandering around in the bushes with a pellet gun …..

    • Glenn – Roberto is right on this one. A firearm designed for a 5.56 can fire either one. The Ruger he mentioned I have also heard that although it is a .223 it is designed as such it will fire the 5.56 safely.

      My preference? 5.56 because it nullifies the either entirely.

  6. By the grace of God and good legislators we were able to keep the UNs paws off our guns. Check to see how your Senator voted so we can oust those who voted for it. I believe the vote passed by 56 to 42 . Too close for my comfort. Arlene.

  7. to Glenn. (although I’m not an expert, I spent 24 years in the US Army, all in Infantry or SF, and have worked for more than 8 years in the firearms business. With that being said…) If you have a 5.56 it can safely shoot .223, but the experts say, (and most of them sit in armchairs in front of the TV) to be careful shooting 5.56 in a .223. The cases have slight differences in wall thickness, powder pressures, etc. However… I’ve fired many 5.56 out of my Series 184 Mini-14 with no problem what-so-ever. But, as they say, ‘Buyer Beware’. (and I will continue to fire 5.56 in any .223. I’ve yet to see any catastrophic problems in the multiple thousands of rounds myself or someone else has fired in the lesser chambered rifles …jus’sayin.)

  8. The mini-14 uses the same barrel as the AC556 select-fire version so no worries using the 5.56 ammo.

    I’m an air rifle junky and have long been preaching their value for practice and small game harvesting. I have two RWS riffles in .177 and also two of their LP8 magnum pistols in the same caliber. Excellent all. I recently picked up a Ruger Yukon in .22 caliber and feel impressed with it so far. Don’t have a lot of rounds through it yet but it certainly sends the pellet down range with a punch. The reason I bought the Ruger is that it is powered with a gas piston instead of a spring which makes it a better choice for hunting. I hate to have an expensive spring piston rifle cocked for long periods of time while hunting for fear of fatiguing the spring. With the gas piston systems there is no such worry.

  9. In my younger days, those maximally confused folk were called queer. These days I suppose, we should call them, ‘common.’
    PR

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