Cops getting set up or infringing on our rights?

I watched a video on YouTube which is another “police infringing on out rights” piece. I am posting it below. The issue I have with many of these video’s is the cops are set up and the person filming is basically begging for trouble. Don’t get me wrong – police should NOT infringe on our rights, but come on! In the video below a guy is filming police vans coming into a police parking garage. Would a terrorist do something like this as part of a planning event prior to an attack? Sure. Does the police officer have a DUTY and responsibility to ask why someone would be filming a police station? I think so.

Here is the video:

In this video the officer was polite and professional. Technically I have the right to video tape in a public area whenever I want to but I also think that if I am videotaping a police department I should expect to get questions. I would absolutely take offense to being questioned if I was videotaping a tourist attraction.

Another situation I saw was a man that was videotaping a SWAT team across his street going into a house. They had a warrant and law enforcement announced over a loud speaker that everyone should go inside and lock their doors. The man videotaping refused to go in and was eventually arrested. He was on his own property and stated he did not have to go inside. Did the officer have a DUTY and responsibility to protect the man from his own decisions regardless of his “rights”? If there ended up being a shootout across the street and the man videotaping was shot – he would likely sue the department. Tough situation.

I am sure some of you may disagree and that is fine as I am pulled in a couple directions on this myself. The problem I have is these people going out and instigating the cops – just to try to lure them into saying or doing something to fit within their agenda. Is there a trend of abusive law enforcement infringing on our rights? Absolutely – but there are many good cops out there as well.

Rourke

 

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7 Comments

  1. LOL, good ole Jacksonville Sheriff’s office, the “bold new city of the south”. Spent 28 yes there, they should worry about solving murder cases instead of riding around on golf carts. They are proud to have the reputation as the murder capitol of Florida.

  2. In this case the officers seemed pretty respectful while trying to do what they were told. It also seemed that they realized that they could only go so far because all they had to work with was a bluff.

  3. Anyone can sue anyone without cause or reason in this, the United States. Fear of suit is no reason for prohibiting or proscribing an action.

    A tenant of common law and target of several of our Bill of Rights hold that actions performed in public are not protected by privacy consideration. On the other hand, the Supreme Court has held that if a person takes steps in order to protect privacy, then it normally would require a warrant for the government to access that private action (Katz v US, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katz_v._United_States).

    Some decades ago it was a presumption that the Bridgeport, Ct police department routinely surveilled the FBI parking garage. Members of the Bridgeport Police feared federal warrants against themselves and by keeping the FBI garage surveilled, they would have advance knowledge of mass exodus of Bureau vehicles signaling process against the corrupt officers.

    In many foreign countries (Tanzania is one), one can be arrested for photographing public buildings, the presumption being that an underlying reason for the activity is pre-planning for an assault, raid, or other terrorist action.

    I would be quite worried if US police took any action against a photographer recording their activities from a public place or other location to which the photographer has legal access (such as his residence or the residence of another by invitation). Such police action would be contrary to a strong fourth estate and would appear to be an activity opposed by several of the Bill of Rights.

    Evil is too often done in a corner, at night, or when masked.

    PR

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